1889 RPD-008: an overlay analysis

>>1889 RPD-008: an overlay analysis
1889 RPD-008: an overlay analysis 2015-03-13T18:35:17+00:00

Home Forums Flying Eagle and Indian Head Cents Forum 1889 RPD-008: an overlay analysis

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  • DVCollectorDVCollector
    Moderator
    Post count: 103
    #6798 |

    I recently picked up this variety in high AU, providing an excellent opportunity for some photo analysis of the RPD. What I really find interesting on this RPD is the 9/9. Compared to most, the RPD is very deep and affects the overall shape of the digit–which will become clear with overlays.

    From what I see, the date shows repunching on 3 digits: a. 1/1 south, b. 8/8 south, and c. a strong 9/9 north.

    As I study this RPD, the first question that comes to mind is “how is the 9/9 so strongly north, yet the 8/8 is weakly south? For this to happen with a single repunching, the 4-digit punch must be rotated around an axis closer to the 8 than the 9. To explain these positions, the date would have to be impressed similar to the overlay below. One note about my overlays–they were carefully traced from a high-grade 1889 IHC. The shape of the digits and their positions match closely to both MS and proof 1889 IHCs I compared.

    To clarify, the blue is the final position of the punch–the yellow is superimposed to explain the 8/8 south–notice how low the 1 digit would have to be? While this roughly covers the 8/8 on the outside, it doesn’t match the doubling on the inside loops, which actually appears linear, ie non-rotational. It’s also rather difficult to explain some things on the 9/9–due to the high rotation. Is it possible the 8/8 was a remnant of another RPD?

    Here’s a second overlay, positioning the RPD to match both the 1/1 and the 9/9 (red outlines). This seems to be a more reasonable position of the first date impression–although the 8/8 cannot be south in this case.

    A closeup of the most interesting part of this RPD, the 9/9. The blue overlay is the final position of the 9. Without the overlays, it’s not as easy to visualize how distorted this digit has become. Unlike most RPDs, the 9/9 is very deep and both digits add to the outside shape, but subtract from the inner shape–resulting in a smaller top loop on the 9.


    • This topic was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by DVCollector DVCollector.
    RussRuss
    Keymaster
    Post count: 117

    Wow, that is pretty good! I reckon that the repunching on the 9 happened independent of the repunching on the 188, as your analysis indicates. This adds to the desirability of the coin, and the boldness of the 9 makes it appealing. There are many RPDs like this one that exhibit repunching off-set in different directions, indicating those dies were were struck multiple times with the date punch.

    One reason the 9 could be so heavily punched is if the punch were angled such only the 9 were in contact with the die face when it was given a tap. With all the pressure applied to this small portion of the punch, it should go deeper. It would also help explain why the repunching is so strong on the 9, while the other digits don’t appear to show any outlines from when the 9 was first tapped.

    Great eye.


    Collecting Flying Eagle and Indian Head pennies never made more cents!

    • This reply was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by Russ Russ.
    DVCollectorDVCollector
    Moderator
    Post count: 103

    This adds to the desirability of the coin, and the boldness of the 9 makes it appealing. There are many RPDs like this one that exhibit repunching off-set in different directions, indicating those dies were were struck multiple times with the date punch.

    I think so too…there really isn’t another 9/9 like this in the whole IHC series, hence my interest in acquiring a high-grade example. Good idea on the 9–I think something rather unusual happened here; an angled punch could explain a few things too. BTW–this one came from David Poliquin’s collection, for a great price too.

    I think this is another case where IHC varieties shouldn’t just be cataloged and forgotten. In Snow’s book, the variety lists an 89/89 north. But from what I’ve seen, it’s just not possible these two digits were repunched at the same time. I haven’t discovered anything really “new” here–the details are quite obvious. I just think if we approach these varieties without preconceived ideas, we’ll learn more. I suspect the MPDs were at least two separate repunchings as well.


    • This reply was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by DVCollector DVCollector.
    RussRuss
    Keymaster
    Post count: 117

    Awesome, do you mind if I make an article out of your post and add it to the research section?


    Collecting Flying Eagle and Indian Head pennies never made more cents!

    DVCollectorDVCollector
    Moderator
    Post count: 103

    Sure thing–I’m glad my overlays are interesting! 😀
    I also have clean pics of the date area–if you think it adds something to the variety page.


    • This reply was modified 2 years, 8 months ago by DVCollector DVCollector.
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